Mobile SEO Strategy

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This is a transcript from our 96th Internet Marketing Podcast(3rd page).

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[podcast]http://ewebstyle.podomatic.com/enclosure/2011-03-23T09_36_59-07_00.mp3[/podcast]

Mobile SEO Strategy
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Mobile SEO Strategy

Chris:                           Another one, “Phones are Personal” was the title of it. The only thing that really made sense in this — and by the way, this is an article by Jim Shellali. Maybe he’s Irish. Shellali.

 

Chuck:                         That’s what I thought.

 

Chris:                           Shellal, okay. There we go. Not Irish. The sentence that made the most sense was, “Make your mobile strategy easy to access and more importantly relevant and personal ’cause mobile really is about personal. It’s you and your phone. Yes, you’re always trying to engage other people at the same time so it is social, but it really is — it breaks down to you.

 

Chuck:                         My phone. It’s personal, yeah.

 

Chris:                           Yeah. So make it personal.

 

Chuck:                         Let’s see here, “Integrate. Integrate. Integrate.” I think that kind of goes along with the example I gave about the video, you know, the whole purpose of integrating — anything done with mobile marketing is to, you know, get the client involved, and then — so you can get some sort of return on the back end; whether it’s them coming in buying something at a discount, you know. The discount they got because they were involved and since they spent money you received something. However it works, just make sure that they’re not doing it for no reason. Make sure that it does integrate with what you’re doing as a core business strategy and not just something just to be doing.

 

Chris:                           Just random, yeah. And I think that goes back — you know, it has a specific parallel to the tip from our last podcast. Google Local Places needs to be part of your focused internet marketing plan, so even social needs to be part of a focused internet marketing plan. We always say whatever you do, don’t just throw money against the wall and see if it sticks. Come up with a plan. So maybe there is a driver that gets them back to your website. Maybe there’s an email collection process so that you can engage them and say, “Hey, thanks for participating. Answer this survey” or “What was your experience like at the burrito palace?” Whatever it may be so that you’re engaging them even further so it’s not just a one off. It really is part of again an overall concept and package.

 

Chuck:                         “Give in order to receive.” That one is just pretty much self-explanatory to me.

 

Chris:                           I think it’s called the “law of reciprocity” —

 

Chuck:                         Yes.

 

Chris:                           — which is when you give up a lot of stuff, people will feel obligated to give back to you.

 

Chuck:                         Well, and then, you know — well, my mom told me a lot of times is when you give, right —

 

Chris:                           Hey, hey, listen up. This is the mom reference. This is like the reference that — like, you know, whenever I’m in an argument and discussing with something, I don’t care what it is, and I just want to win —

 

Chuck:                         Yeah.

 

Chris:                           — “My mom said…”

 

Chuck:                         “My momma said…”

 

[Laughter]

 

Chuck:                         Well, momma said, when you give, right, and your hand is open —

 

Chris:                           Right. Oh, yeah, as soon as —

 

Chuck:                         — so you can receive.

 

Chris:                           Yup.

 

Chuck:                         And so — yeah.

 

Chris:                           I like that. That’s good.

 

Chuck:                         Yeah. Awesome.

 

Chris:                           You know what? I got to segue on this. There was a famous saying that is actually a mistranslation which is “Better to give than to receive.” And one of the points I took to this training a while back, and one of the points that it made was that if somebody is not receiving, you actually can’t give. They’re equal like if this — whoever isn’t going to receive then you can’t give.

 

Chuck:                         Then how can you give something?

 

Chris:                           And also, the bad translation was — is the actual translation, I believe it’s a Greek proverb is “It’s better to be in a position to give than to need to receive.” And I think that goes without — almost without saying. [Laughter] But what a bastardization of that proverb, you know, ’cause it’s totally — it has a totally different meaning. Anyway, there’s my Greek translation edification for the day. Next.

 

Chuck:                         “Promote your call to action.”

 

Chris:                           Okay. And this is from — article from Motomessage.com.

 

Chuck:                         Yeah, Motomessage.com.

 

Chris:                           Okay.

 

Chuck:                         Pretty cool site, all about mobile marketing. Go check it out. But yeah, “Promote your call to action.” And basically, what they’re saying is, you know, if you have a call to action ,which you should on your site, let’s say —

 

Chris:                           On your site, on your Facebook page.

 

Chuck:                         Yeah.

 

Chris:                           On your Twitter page, on your — on your… [Laughter]

 

Chuck:                         Yeah. Use that same CTA in your mobile marketing. If it’s through an app, if it’s through some text messages, however your mobile marketing campaign is working, keep your CTA consistent.

 

Chris:                           Yup. That makes sense. And this article is a little more focused on SMS, and it’s just totally relevant.

 

Chuck:                         Yeah.

 

Chris:                           So that’s why — that’s why we’re kind of including this. And the title is “Five Mobile Marketing Tips to Help Your SMS Campaign.” We just want to make sure if you guys want to go look this up, you can certainly — you can go find it. So the next one is “Reward your customers for signing up.” You know, this kind of goes back to what we’ve been saying through the whole part of this which is give and receive.

 

Chuck:                         Show me the benefit for signing up. I won’t sign up for no reason.

 

Chris:                           Yup. Yeah. You know, I’d sign up for a free two liter soda with your next large two-topping pizza purchased from generic pizza company.com.

 

Chuck:                         Yeah.

 

Chris:                           So make it worth their while, and if you’re really creative, you know, in some sense we haven’t — my brother-in-law is an incredible — like he used to work for Clear Channel and was really good at putting like promotions and events and things and — so if you’ve got somebody who is good at that, take advantage of that, you know. Maybe you have the tricycle race in your parking lot or something, you know, and you got a down a Coke or a slushy, brain freeze every time you go around or whatever; make some event out of it and incorporate that into your mobile strategy.

 

Chuck:                         “Limit the amount of offers you send.” Don’t spam.

 

Chris:                           Oh, yeah.

 

Chuck:                         I don’t care if you’re free.

 

Chris:                           Yeah. [Laughter]

 

Chuck:                         Like I don’t need to get a text daily and, you know — and I almost sent this out to someone, you know, I do some concert and club promoting occasionally. There are some promoters who, man, if you Facebook me about the concert, and you tweeted me about the concert, and you text me about the concert, that’s fine. Just don’t do it every day. But you know, I’ll get all three versions on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. And Thursday I may get them twice, you know, ’cause the concert is Friday.

 

Chris:                           Oh, wow.

 

Chuck:                         And so — yeah, come on now. You’ll get blocked, removed, and flagged to spam.

 

Chris:                           Yeah. You kind of know what they’re doing. There needs to be — I understand some ramp up. Make it reasonable.

 

Chuck:                         Make it reasonable.

 

Chris:                           Yeah. And people understand that. Reward your customers. We already talked about that already. That goes back, you know, reward for signing up and then continue to reward them, you know.

 

Chuck:                         Yeah.

 

Chris:                           If they’re — you know, there’s a reason coupons work. There’s a reason specials, buy one get one free work, ’cause it gets people in the doors, and then they can purchase other things.

 

Chuck:                         Well, and that really has a deeper meaning. That’s how you get — your repeat business, and you get referrals. When the customer is happy, I’m subject to tell him what I just did, and he’ll go try it because I recommended it. Over getting a text about it that I’ll probably delete.

 

Chris:                           Well, and you know, reward your customers. There’s all this kind of stamp the card or whatever.

 

Chuck:                         Those are awesome.

 

Chris:                           Yeah. I think — you know, I wonder if anybody is doing that with FourSquare, although just checking in, you‘ve got to be careful of that, but if there’s some way to tie in —

 

Chuck:                         Yeah, I’ll just check in.

 

Chris:                           Yeah, just drive by, check in. Twenty check-ins later. I’m here for my free sandwich.

 

Chuck:                         Yeah.

 

Chris:                           And I’ll check in then too. [Laughter] So there’s probably some way in the — you know, FourSquare is not planning on it. There’s probably somebody else who was like, okay, check in and have them scan it.

 

Chuck:                         Maybe the QR code comes into place then.

 

Chris:                           The code that’s on the receipt, add that into your list, and then now they know.

 

Chuck:                         Oh, that would be an awesome place for a QR code.

 

Chris:                           Yeah.

 

Chuck:                         On the receipt.

 

Chris:                           Oh, boom! Yeah. Nobody steal that.

 

Chuck:                         Yeah, QR code on the receipt.

 

Chris:                           QR code on the receipt. By the way, I did want to mention, I’d love some feedback. Who uses QR codes? ‘Cause I don’t use QR codes; I haven’t yet. I probably will someday, and the day I use it won’t be — I don’t feel will be ’cause I’m trying to get information. It will be because I just want to —

 

Chuck:                         I want to see.

 

Chris:                           — see what happens when I scan it.

 

Chuck:                         If you don’t know QR code is the black and white box similar to a barcode except it has a graphic image on it. You can scan it with your mobile device, and it will take you somewhere depending on what they have it set up for and so —

 

Chris:                           Usually like a page, I’m assuming, like a web page.

 

Chuck:                         Usually it’s a web page. Usually it’s a shortcut to an app. Sometimes it’s a YouTube video. I’ve seen them used to go to different things.

 

Chris:                           I was actually part of a beta program, literally this was probably seven years ago, and it was by — I think it was by Popular Science or Popular Mechanics, one of those. And it said hold this up to the webcam, then nobody had a camera on their phone. And it would take you to a particular web page. I think I tried it once. I don’t think it worked. And again, I don’t think — I would have ever used it even if it did work, right? You know — I don’t know. And finally, we got “Help your customers spread the message.” I think that’s huge.

 

Chuck:                         That’s paramount.

 

Chris:                           Yup. ‘Cause that’s where you start getting kind of the viral benefits or wit the exponential benefits, you know; where he tells two friends, and she tells two friends and so on and so on. There was a famous shampoo commercial that was the whole commercial, and she tells two friends and she tells — all right. Anyway, so have everyone tell two friends. So what are some — you got any ideas about how do you get somebody? Forward it to a friend. Make sure there’s a forward to a friend button to be sure.

 

Chuck:                         Yeah. Facebook likes, you know, share with a friend. Use – add the share button to the bottom of your pages and do it that way.

 

Chris:                           And the great example we talked in a podcast probably about 10 podcasts ago, where there was a burrito company. I think they had maybe 20 followers, and this was in California. And they offered a free burrito to anyone who tweeted and had like a thousand people show up. And you know, you know the marketing dude was like, “Hey, at least we could get 20 people in today, and they deserve it,” whatever, a thousand people showed up. They had to give like rain checks.

 

Chuck:                         Yeah, ’cause —

 

Chris:                           “We’re out of tortillas.” [Laughter]

 

Chuck:                         Yeah. Be prepared. Yeah. Hope for the best.

 

Chris:                           Exactly.

 

Chuck:                         Don’t do it thinking nobody is going to show up. You don’t want to be that company.

 

Chris:                           All right. That is all of the information we have. I know there is a little blank stare news so…

 

Chuck:                         That’s an awesome place there. Oh blank stare. JC Penney, oh, my God. Come on. You know, JC Penney got in trouble from Google because apparently they had a firm doing their SEO, and they went out and created all these fictitious sites with all these fictitious links, and they pretty much spammed search engines with links all back to JC Penney.

 

Chris:                           And JC Penney would show up for like comfortable shirts —

 

Chuck:                         Dresses.

 

Chris:                           Little black dress was one of them that was mentioned.

 

Chuck:                         Yeah, yeah, bad pads. All kinds of stuff. And so what was funny was that the people did it so well, that even if you searched for a brand name, JC Penney showed up —

 

Chris:                           First.

 

Chuck:                         — above that brand name. And so — yeah, JC Penney, come on, dude. You didn’t get influx of online searches generated.

 

Chris:                           Yeah. [Laughter] And that influx of online sales didn’t plummet for no reason.

 

Chuck:                         Exactly.

 

Chris:                           Because Google bumped it to like page 7 or something, right?

 

Chuck:                         Yeah. As a matter fact, Advertising Aid said, “They should have hired me.”

 

Chris:                           Yeah. That was — that was I think that was cool. So somebody got a — kind of two popular pieces of SEO information, which was your rap that bumped up 20,000 views and the fact that JC Penney got in trouble, it’s like, hey, JC Penney should have just hired the SEO Rapper.

 

Chuck:                         Yeah, I would have made it look cool and done it right.

 

Chris:                           The difference between you and me, he makes it look cool. [Laughter] All right. You have been listening to the most popular SEO podcast on iTunes. That is because of you. We really appreciate you guys listening.

 

Chuck:                         Yes.

 

Chris:                           We love it when you stalk us. I think one of our Facebook posts the other day was I — that somebody just started stalking us. Thank you. You can stalk us, Facebook.com/ewebstyle, Twitter.com/ewebstyle, YouTube.com/e-webstyle.

 

Chuck:                         Yes.

 

Chris:                           Hit us up, email podcast@e-webstyle.com. Yes, we do websites, and if you have any doubts about that, make sure you check out our Facebook page. Darren Booy put together a South Park rendition of the podcast crew. It’s brilliant, and it’s got a bloody stump writing, “Yyes, we also do podcast” — I mean —

 

Chuck:                         Websites.

 

Chris:                           — websites and podcast. I think that’s all the information we have for you. We really — well, you know what? We had a couple of people who submit iTunes reviews. Go ahead. If you’re getting good information out of that — out of this podcast, give us a review on our Facebook page, and if you could, it just takes a minute. Make an iTunes account. Give us a review. In fact, we’d also appreciate a little link love. One of the things I put at the bottom of that page kind of describing the process we went to to get our webpage back —

 

Chuck:                         To where it is, yeah.

 

Chris:                           — for our SEO podcast was, “Hey, let’s see what kind of link love we can get and see if we can bump some of these other people,” ’cause some of the people ahead of us are no longer producing podcast.

 

Chuck:                         Yeah.

 

Chris:                           And —

 

Chuck:                         It really sucks.

 

Chris:                           [Laughter] And all right, thank you guys for listening. My name is Chris Burres.

 

Chuck:                         Charles Lewis.

 

Chris:                           Bye-bye for now.

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