Local Media Marketing Trends – #SEOpodcast 254

Chris Burres:               [Laughter] He forgot to pay his bill. Google rejects 58% of right to be forgotten submissions. I just thought that was interesting since we mentioned the right to be forgotten. They had some 600,000 or something –

Charles Lewis:             Request that they get, man –

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             …you have it on, nope –

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             …you don’t have the right apparently. [Laughter]

Chris Burres:               [Laughter] We are not going to forget you. Or forget you with regard to forgetting you. I don’t know. Price Waterhouse employee fired because of Comcast. Did you read about this? The dude’s name is Conal O’Rourke. He works for Price Waterhouse. He’s not even actually an auditor. But he was having billing nightmares with Comcast. And this is not a big surprise, Comcast –

[Crosstalk]

Charles Lewis:             Yeah, I always have –

[Crosstalk]

Chris Burres:               …notorious –

Charles Lewis:             …billing issues –

[Crosstalk]

Chris Burres:               …problems –

Charles Lewis:             …with Comcast, uh huh.

Chris Burres:               We’ve got one client who has two Comcast accounts and they continue to apply their payments despite the notification on the check to the one account and the other account goes down regularly. So, it’s not that big of a surprise. So, Conal has billing issues like three years’ worth of billing issues. He’s calling whatever.

Charles Lewis:             Uh huh.

Chris Burres:               He suggests that Comcast research and figured out that he worked for Price Waterhouse and then reached out to Price Waterhouse to get him fired. Yeah, and –

Charles Lewis:             [Laughter] It was like –

Chris Burres:               …and –

Charles Lewis:             …Comcast has time to –

Chris Burres:               …and Comcast is – has says that he invoked the Price Waterhouse name while he was talking to – he actually called the controller. This is the –

[Crosstalk]

Charles Lewis:             Oh, he escalated –

[Crosstalk]

Charles Lewis:             Yeah, he –

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             …escalated, escalated, escalated.

Chris Burres:               And then they’re saying he namedropped. And then when he namedropped, they called the Price Waterhouse to say, “Hey, you got one of your employees namedropping to try and get his bill ironed out.” Which is pretty bad –

Charles Lewis:             Yeah.

Chris Burres:               …I mean –

Charles Lewis:             Somewhat douchey.

Chris Burres:               Really douchey, Comcast, you know. So, you get another bad tick on my book. Should he have mentioned it? No.

Charles Lewis:             Yeah, dude showing –

Chris Burres:               But you make a mistake –

Charles Lewis:             …his part as well –

Chris Burres:               …just fix it.

Charles Lewis:             Yeah.

Chris Burres:               Like just fix it. You don’t have to try and get him fired or even let him know what they’re doing because you screwed up. And he’s, you know, maybe not the brightest, you know, sharpest tack in the box.

Charles Lewis:             That’s interesting. Yeah, that’s – hmm.

Chris Burres:               Right? It’s – you can see parallels, whatever, he should have never – if he invoked the name, he should never, I just don’t think that people have time to research like Comcast isn’t going to go –

[Crosstalk]

Charles Lewis:             Go –

Chris Burres:               …let’s find out where he works for. And –

Charles Lewis:             And do –

Chris Burres:               …oh –

Charles Lewis:             …that. Yeah. Dude, we know you said it, bro. Like stop it.

Chris Burres:               Yeah. So alright, we have a little bit –

Charles Lewis:             Yeah.

Chris Burres:               …of reviews. [Laughter] The reviews – this one is from Anthony Cavins, punch in the face. By the way, Anthony deserves like a couple – a whole PITF. If you want to know what a PITF looks like, go on to our –

Charles Lewis:             I saw that tweet. [Laughter]

Chris Burres:               …go on to our Facebook page.

Charles Lewis:             Yeah.

Chris Burres:               And you will see what a PITF looks like. Now, we got a sound and a look and that look is provided by Anthony Cavins. So –

Charles Lewis:             Man, punch in the face to you.

Chris Burres:               Punch in the face to you. And he also wrote a review on our G+ account. He said – on our G+ Local Page. He says, “Hello, I’ve been enjoying your show. I just discovered it this week but I’ve already listened to ten episodes. It was in a bit of a rut with – I was in a bit of a rut with doing SEO on my job website and I’ve been putting your tips to use. Thank you.”

[0:15:02]

Charles Lewis:             Man, that’s what’s up.

Chris Burres:               Yup, PITF. Punch in the face.

Charles Lewis:             Punch in the face to Anthony Cavins. Okay, I bet – that’s my same PITF I got here. This is on Twitter too.

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             NK.

Chris Burres:               Yup.

Charles Lewis:             It has, you know.

Chris Burres:               Yup. And then the next one is on Stitcher. This is Terry Crosby. Remember, we’ve –

Charles Lewis:             Uh huh.

Chris Burres:               …we’ve been – we go way back with Terry. Thank you –

Charles Lewis:             Wow.

Chris Burres:               …for continuing to be – 15 days ago. Punch in the face to Terry. 5 out of 5 stars, so that’s a 5-star.

Charles Lewis:             5-star.

Chris Burres:               Thank you, Terry review, “Best SEO podcast out there. I’ve been listening to this podcast years…”

Charles Lewis:             Years.

Chris Burres:               “…and I always learn.” Smiley face.

Charles Lewis:             Man, that’s what’s up, Terry.

Chris Burres:               Yeah. Terry –

Charles Lewis:             Appreciate that –

[Crosstalk]

Charles Lewis:             Are we on in the –

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             …in the punch in the face mood, that one, yeah, goes out to NK when he did hit us on Twitter, he said, “I just discovered you, guys. I look forward to digging through the podcast archives.”

Chris Burres:               Cool.

Charles Lewis:             And I hit him back and I said, “Well look, today is 254.” [Laughter]

Chris Burres:               Yup.

Charles Lewis:             So –

[Crosstalk]

Chris Burres:               You got a lot of work to do.

Charles Lewis:             You got a lot of work to do, exactly. I want to give another punch in the face to Anthony Rojas –

Chris Burres:               PITF.

Charles Lewis:             …over at MakeMeBuyStuff.com.

Chris Burres:               MakeMe –

Charles Lewis:             And so –

Chris Burres:               …wait, wait, wait, MakeMeBuyStuff.com. That’s –

Charles Lewis:             [Laughter]

Chris Burres:               …that’s pretty awesome.

Charles Lewis:             MakeMeBuyStuff.com. So –

[Crosstalk]

Charles Lewis:             …he called in. And we’re going to do a web anal on his site. But he asked a question.

Chris Burres:               Okay.

Charles Lewis:             His question was how can he tell if his site has been penalized or not?

Chris Burres:               Okay, that’s a great question.

Charles Lewis:             Anthony, great question. So, really two ways. First, you have to kind of figure out what type of penalty, right? So, if this is let’s say a manual penalty, meaning that Google has manually blocked your site due to maybe some thin content or some bad links or whatever it is, then that notification you can find in your Webmaster Tool set up. Log in. You’ll see the messages and they will tell you why you’ve been manually penalized.

However, if you check there and you don’t see any messages but you’ve noticed the decrease in site traffic, then you could be facing an algorithmic penalty which is that your site been affected due to some algorithm change that Google made.

And if that’s the case, then you really want to go back and research when you notice the decrease in your traffic. Then maybe find out the number of algorithms that have happened and when and what algorithm it was and what it did. So, for example, maybe you noticed a decrease in traffic right around the time of Penguin rolled out happen. Then likely you – that decrease happened because you were – have bad links or something like that. Or maybe it was a Panda roll out. And therefore – and you noticed a decrease. Then check your content and check those things.

And so, I will do that. You can search our podcast. I have to locate that one for you when we went through all of the algorithms. And that way you can know which one maybe affected your site.

Chris Burres:               Your rap would cover that too, wouldn’t it? Or they –

[Crosstalk]

Charles Lewis:             Man –

[Crosstalk]

Chris Burres:               …may have missed one –

[Crosstalk]

Charles Lewis:             …break that – they’re like 2012?

Chris Burres:               Yeah. But I think remember they’ve just been doing updates to those.

Charles Lewis:             Yeah.

Chris Burres:               So, if it’s – even if it has been since 2012, most of what they’ve released has been Panda updates –

Charles Lewis:             Yeah.

Chris Burres:               …and Penguin updates, and I think you have mentioned – you may not have mentioned Penguin. No, I think you did.

Charles Lewis:             I mentioned Penguin. I mentioned Panda.

Chris Burres:               Panda. So –

Charles Lewis:             Yeah.

Chris Burres:               …those are going to be the two major ones that you’re going to want to figure out, you know, what iteration of those actually cause that problem.

Charles Lewis:             Definitely.

Chris Burres:               Punch in the face and I guess we’ll be talking to him a little bit later.

Charles Lewis:             Uh huh.

Chris Burres:               Alright, alright. Alright, that is the potatoes of our podcast. It’s now time to get in to the meat.

Charles Lewis:             Get in to the meat of the podcast. Man, I really love this part here. So, I was at Search Engine Land today. I want to give a punch in the face to Wesley Young.

Chris Burres:               Wesley Young, PITF.

Charles Lewis:             Yeah, Wesley Young, PITF. Punch in the face to you, man. Great article. He posted an article, 10 Trends In Local Media That Every Marketer Must Know.

Chris Burres:               Okay. So, not just internet marketer, every marketer.

Charles Lewis:             10 Trends –

Chris Burres:               Alright.

Charles Lewis:             …In Local – Local –

Chris Burres:               Local mean –

[Crosstalk]

Charles Lewis:             …keyword Local Media That Every Marketer Must Know. And yeah, just every marketer. Now, then he goes on to say, “What do local marketers need to know as they prepare for 2015?” And so, this is the trends of what’s going to happen next year and as a marketing person who’s focusing on local business, what you should be aware of.

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             Let’s take it a step further. I say since we’re an internet marketing agency, let’s look at this from an internet marketing perspective.

Chris Burres:               Perspective, perfect.

Charles Lewis:             Alright?

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             And so, number one he says, Consumers Are Increasingly Dependent On Mobile Usage. I totally agree. He goes on to say, “35% of aggregate web traffic in the U.S. comes from mobile phones and tablets.” So, as an internet marketer, what does that mean? That means you should be creating mobile-focused campaigns whether you’re doing ads and PPC like AdWords and Ad Center or maybe you’re doing social ads like Facebook and things like that. Make sure your marketing strategy includes some focus on mobile –

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             …because it’s continuously growing. And then I would also encourage you to do social mobile activities –

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             …social mobile activities.

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             What is that? For a Foursquare check-in. Facebook check-in even. That’s a social mobile activity. Encourage those especially if –

Chris Burres:               Reward them, right?

Charles Lewis:             Yes. Especially if you’re a retailer business where you have a place where people come and they spend time and while they’re there, they shop. They eat. They do something. Foursquare and a lot of the social mobile stuff is going to be extremely efficient and effective for marketing.

[0:20:03]

Chris Burres:               I always like your story in Starbucks when you were Foursquare checking in, they’re like, “Hey, Mr. Lewis.”

Charles Lewis:             No, that was – that wasn’t in Starbucks. That was –

Chris Burres:               Don’t want to give credit to a multibillionaire working collaboration –

[Crosstalk]

Charles Lewis:             That was Red Robin.

Chris Burres:               Red Robin. Okay, yeah.

Charles Lewis:             That was Red Robin. Checking on Red Robin on Foursquare, you get 20% off your meal.

Chris Burres:               Oh, yeah.

Charles Lewis:             And the store manager came and found me.

Chris Burres:               Yeah, it’s cool.

Charles Lewis:             Yeah, I thought it was awesome. So, number two, he says, Consumers Use Their Mobile Devices For Payments and they do. And this is growing. This is growing and growing and growing. And I think the key here is not only just for payments but from a – as a business entity for accepting payments.

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             There’s a lot of PayPal here and a lot of Square and a lot of that going on. And so, he goes on to say, he named such as O2 wallet or Isis Mobile Wallet. I haven’t heard of that one.

Chris Burres:               Me either.

Charles Lewis:             Passbook. I haven’t heard of that one. Square, I’m familiar with that one. Dwolla. I used that one. Actually, PayPal compared to them only charge $1 –

Chris Burres:               Oh, wow.

Charles Lewis:             …no matter how much the amount it. Kind of cool.

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             LevelUp, GoWallet and GoogleWallet and then of course, the Apple Pay. And so, you know, I think my message to businesses from an internet marketing perspective is to update your transaction technology.

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             Don’t force people to only be able to pay you in one way.

Chris Burres:               One way, yeah.

Charles Lewis:             Like give some options because the more options you have, the more chances you can get paid. Now, it’s getting backfire, right?

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             We talked about the story with the jelly, right and too many options and so, they –

Chris Burres:               Yeah, yeah.

Charles Lewis:             …don’t anything. You don’t – you have to be clear and careful on how you present it.

Chris Burres:               Yeah, I think that doesn’t apply when it you get to the payment side –

Charles Lewis:             When you get read to check –

[Crosstalk]

Chris Burres:               …because they’re already made, they decide. You’ve only given them limited number of options. Go back and listen to a couple of our podcasts. We talked about this study regularly. And so, they’ve – you’ve given them a limited number of options so, they aren’t overwhelmed by how many options they have. They choose one. And now, they’re just figuring out how they want to pay like the decision to pay is already been done. Now, you want to actually give them as many options as possible because I don’t – in my mind –

Charles Lewis:             I think you have to present them the –

[Crosstalk]

Chris Burres:               You also want to present –

[Crosstalk]

Charles Lewis:             …there’s a –

[Crosstalk]

Charles Lewis:             …making –

[Crosstalk]

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             Yes.

Chris Burres:               Don’t have like some –

Charles Lewis:             [Making Sound]

Chris Burres:               …long page of like Dwolla and PayPal and you know, GoogleWallet and –

Charles Lewis:             Yeah.

Chris Burres:               …you know, iPay – oh, yeah.

Charles Lewis:             Yeah, group them –

[Crosstalk]

Charles Lewis:             …by most popular then –

[Crosstalk]

Chris Burres:               Have them grougenized.

Charles Lewis:             Grougenized.

Chris Burres:               [Laughter]

Charles Lewis:             Groupenized.

Chris Burres:               Groupenized.

Charles Lewis:             [Laughter]

Chris Burres:               [Laughter]

Charles Lewis:             And that’s our Word of the Week. [Laughter]

Chris Burres:               [Laughter]

Charles Lewis:             Let’s see here. So, yeah, I said make it easy to pay. And I think about this. It’s kind of like Apple Store.

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             When you go to the Apple Store, you purchase, there is no checkout counter –

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             …right? Whoever helped you will check you out right then. And so, that’s improvement in how people can transact with them. Number three, he says, Local Advertisers May Have Many Tools Available To Connect Their Online And Offline Worlds. We talk about this frequently. And so, I think the key here for our internet marketers is just make sure you have the basics.

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             “And what are the basics, Chuck in regards to online and offline world?” Well, like for example, receipt tape. If you have one physical establishment and you sell shoes, then on your receipt tape maybe give people online coupons or a QR code on that coupon. So, now they’re in store but they’re doing an action that’s going to bring them back online. And then may – then you do vice versa.

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             Right? Maybe as email marketing campaigns or something like that. Maybe you’re Facebooking your followers and what people who liked you with coupons that they can print and do well with.

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             Come back in the store.

Chris Burres:               Come back in the store.

Charles Lewis:             [Laughter]

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             Yeah. And so, you use those things to keep that cycle going offline and online.

Chris Burres:               In store only coupon, off – yeah.

Charles Lewis:             Exactly.

Chris Burres:               Online –

Charles Lewis:             Online only coupon that sort of deal. So, definitely take advantage of that because – because users are doing it. Number four, Location-Based Targeting Results In More Promising Customer Leads. And we’ve – duh, right?

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             This is one of those BFOs. [Laughter]

Chris Burres:               Yeah, blinding flashes –

Chris Burres:               …of the obvious –

Charles Lewis:             Of the obvious, yeah. It is what it is. People, especially in regards to local search from doing – for searching for something local and then – and I’m getting a location-based result. That means the result is where my locality is, then I’m likely going to convert.

He goes on to say, “Display ads are customized using demographic data or other data in audiences like income, homeownership or age.” And so, I think from a marketing perspective and we’re talking about the trends going to next year, I think what you have to do is consider the options, right? When you got Foursquare really dedicating, they’re shifting their whole focus to local search, run ads there.

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             And so, that way if they happen to be, I don’t know, at the Wal-Mart, down the street from your place where you do or changes and they’re checking in at Wal-Mart, you can run your ad there, right, because that’s somebody who’s driving in the area and they’re close to you.

[0:25:00]

                                    And so, take advantage of that. One of the things I put on here – or let’s say acquire dealership.

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             We’re talking about demographic stuff, right? You realize that you can run ads based on location targeting.

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             So, maybe we’re targeting a higher end area, right. So, all of your car ads are for Mercedes and Lexus’s –

Chris Burres:               Yup.

Charles Lewis:             …and this and that. And maybe if you’re targeting a lower income zip code, then you’re targeting a more cost effective vehicle.

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             Malibus and Impalas, things like that. And so, you can set that up. And the key is doing it, right. Google AdWords gave you the tools. Facebook ads have the tools. Bing Ad Center provides these tools –

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             …to target locations. You just have to take advantage of it.

Chris Burres:               Spend a little bit of time –

Charles Lewis:             Yeah.

Chris Burres:               …it’s worth it.

Charles Lewis:             Or hire an agency.

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             [Laughter] Number five, The Rise Of Wearable Devices. And this is interesting because – he goes on to say, “Wearable devices are changing business models and how they interact with the consumers.” And they are…slightly. I think it’s going to take some while – a while to be widely adapted –

[Crosstalk]

Chris Burres:               I think that’s ahead of the curve.

Charles Lewis:             Yeah.

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             It’s definitely ahead of the curve but I think what you should start putting in place especially for like, again, these retail businesses, places where people are walking through. They’re spending time. Take advantage of the fact that people may have wearable technology. Good example, let’s say you were in let’s say Dave & Buster’s –

Chris Burres:               Alright.

Charles Lewis:             …or some sort of recreation place where you can play games. And they normally use a card that you swipe in this and that. What if I could scan something with this bar code scanner that’s on my watch –

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             …sort of deal.

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Charles Lewis:             Or maybe I’m walking through Wal-Mart or Kroger, my favorite grocery store and I need to find a lowest price on this, I can scan it with these devices. The fact that I’m wearing this device means it’s more accessible. And so, I can use it for more things. So, keep that in mind. Maybe –

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             …you’re in an event –

Chris Burres:               Right.

Charles Lewis:             …you just need to send notifications like we have a lunch and learn coming up –

[Crosstalk]

Chris Burres:               Yeah.

Avatar
AUTHOR: Jay Gaura
No Comments

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.